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03 August 2010 @ 08:19 am
Book Discussion: Midnight Never Come and In Ashes Lie, by Marie Brennan  
Hi there.

This month we're going to discuss Guest of Honor Marie Brennan's novels Midnight Never Come and In Ashes Lie. These books are set in both the real world London of Queen Elizabeth I and in the Onyx Court of the fae below the city. These versions of London are intimately linked and rely on each other for their existence in ways that may not be readily apparent to the residents of either place. The faeries need the humans to believe in them so they will tithe them the bread that allows them to walk freely above ground.

The humans don't seem to have a similar need for the fae, but the two worlds are linked, both physically and politically. What does the mortal world gain from the faery?

In what ways do the mortal and faery worlds mirror each other? Do you think it's mostly a physical reflection, in the stones and walls that connect above and below, or do you think the political and personal events of the people on both sides affect each other more?

Cheers,
Sarah
 
 
 
Tour Guide Barbie: book addictkinderjedi on August 3rd, 2010 03:27 pm (UTC)
I love these books so much. :D

Do you think it's mostly a physical reflection, in the stones and walls that connect above and below, or do you think the political and personal events of the people on both sides affect each other more?

I don't think it's merely physical, though the physical similarities are striking. To me, the political and personal connections are much stronger - the ambitions and intrigues of each world are so intricately woven together and feed off of each other right from the beginning, when Invidiana and Elizabeth strike their bargain.

Edited at 2010-08-03 03:28 pm (UTC)
swan_tower on August 4th, 2010 12:17 am (UTC)
Just as a heads-up to interested parties: I'm giving away three advance reader copies of A Star Shall Fall (the next book in the series) over on GoodReads.

Now I'll go back to lurking. :-)
Negotiation Barbiepraetorianguard on August 4th, 2010 03:18 pm (UTC)
I think it's more than merely physical, too. I thought it was interesting that while, intellectually, I get that one of the prominent markers of urban fantasy is that the city itself is practically a character (e.g., the Jersey shore in Tithe, NYC in City of Bones, Minneapolis in War for the Oaks), I didn't really read it viscerally until I read Midnight Never Come where London -- its history, its people, its geography -- is so integral to the story. Bring on the urban fantasy!

SPOILER
I think my best example of the intertwining of the mortal world and the faery world is the fire in In Ashes Lie. Lune's court is weakened by both her court's actions and the political upheaval in London. As a result, the Onyx Court is vulnerable to attack -- and so is London (and in fact, the Scottish fae attack London as a way to attack Lune). When the dragon is banished, Lune saves London, and therefore, her court (or her court, and therefore London).

The aspect of these books that I liked best really was how intertwined mortal and fae are, how vital they are to the other, and how most people/fae don't even know it.